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Torrox

Torrox is Nerja’s western neighbour which you’ll likely have passed through if you’ve flown into Malaga airport. It’s an interesting town with two very different sides to it in that it’s essentially split into two halves. Torrox pueblo located approximately 4km from the coast and nestled at the feet of the Sierra Almijara Mountains is the older side of Torrox with the modern coastal part housing the majority of the municipality’s 17,000 or so inhabitants.


torrox village 1
torrox village 1
torrox village 2
torrox village 3
torrox village 4
torrox costa 1
torrox costa 2
torrox costa 3
torrox costa 4

It’s believed that the origins of Torrox belong to the Roman era with Torrox being a factory city called Caviclum. The arrival of the Arabs to the town brought with it a new industry, silk production, thanks to the popularity of the material in Malaga and Granada. This led to the planting of hundreds of mulberry trees on the terraced hillsides which were a key resource in the materials production.


The pueblo is a pretty white walled town of the Mudéjar style, similar to Frigiliana although lacking a little bit of the charm. The village has a number of local authority offices that serve the wider area so the main village square can sometimes have a more business like feel about it with lawyers and officials coming and going. This is a nice place to sit on a summer’s day after taking a stroll around some of the pretty streets or after visiting the 15th century church.


The coastal side to Torrox is great if you feel like a walk along the promenade which has recently been extended to around 2km long. There are numerous bars and restaurants along the stretch for you to stop at if you feel like a drink or ice cream and plenty of parking if you don’t feel like getting there by bus or taxi. It’s also great for a beach day with 9km of beaches within the municipality, most of which are long, wide and regularly cleaned in the summer months.


The town’s principle claim to fame is that it has the best climate in Europe, or more accurately the most moderate, with the annual average temperature being a cosy 18 degrees. This has aided the town greatly in its two main industries, agriculture with tropical fruits such as avocados, custard apples, mangos and loquats growing here and tourism with the town being popular with the Spanish, British and Germans. In fact Torrox has proven to be particularly popular with the Germans, with the municipality being home to one of the largest German populations in Spain.